Saturday, December 3, 2016

CHRISTMAS BOUTIQUE one week from today!

For those of you searching for a great book to give this Christmas, you'll want to stop by my table at the Christmas Boutique this coming Saturday!





Date: December 9th and 10th

Time: 9-4

Place: Kearns Senior Center
           4851 W. 4715 S.
           Kearns, Utah

I will have all of my books there other than my marketing book which has sold out for this year. Plan on an updated Marketing Your Book on a Budget in January of 2017!

A couple of things you'll want to know before you come.

First, the Parable series will be on sale for $25 for the set of three books.

The Parables of Virginia Bean (3 Book Series) by  Kathryn Elizabeth Jones

Second, the Susan Cramer Mystery series, currently a set of three, will also be $25.

Scrambled (A Susan Cramer Mystery Book 1)


Sunny Side-Up (A Susan Cramer Mystery Book 2)

Hard Boiled (A Susan Cramer Mystery Book 3)

Buy a single book for only $10!

Come and get an autographed copy and ask me about my new mystery series for teens that will be coming out beginning the fall of 2017.

This is my LAST book signing until the new year, so now is the time to get your signed copy!

See you on Saturday!

Kathryn




Friday, December 2, 2016

Thursday, December 1, 2016

THANKFUL THURSDAY

Image result for december memes

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

AUTHOR INTERVIEW: M.J. Colewood (Mark Colenutt and Jacqueline Wood)


Tell me a about yourself. What got you started in writing?

Mark: Six months laid up in bed after a leg operation. I had to put that time to good use so I decided to write a book as I didn’t have any money to play with on the stock exchange, my other probable project at that time.

Jacqueline: My father used to invent stories for me at bedtime when I was tiny and I would usually get him to change the ending, or things that I didn’t like along the way. Then, at the age of eight I spent hours writing a book, which I presented to my headmaster. He even wrote a critique back.


How do you schedule your writing time? When do you write?

Mark: Whenever my little one is asleep. Also, being a teacher I get some extra holiday time and that is when I get the bulk of my writing done.

Jacqueline: I’ve just given up teaching and both my children are at university, so I now have more time to write. I need to work out a schedule though, as when I sit down to write I can get so absorbed that I don’t get anything else done!

How and where do you write? Do you prefer a lap top or some other method of getting your words down?

Mark: Laptop is king and I write wherever I get time. The place is never a problem, only time is the controlling factor. So, in the livingroom, kitchen, on my knee on the train, in a café wherever.

Jacqueline: I use my laptop but it’s quite large so that does restrict where I can use it. I usually write at the dining room table or on the sofa. I’ve also started using my son’s old bedroom as a writing room. I would like a smaller laptop so that I can pop it into my bag and write anywhere.

Get the Book
at Amazon
What's your favorite part about writing? Your least favorite part about writing?

Mark: The best part is being creative and setting down in words an idea that will make a reader pause for thought or a scene that will make them laugh or delight them, afford them a moment of escapism.

Jacqueline: I love it when I get into the writing flow. In those moments, it’s as if I’ve stepped into the story and my fingers are typing on their own. The worst part is the proof checking.

How did you come up with your book idea? How long did it take you to write your book?

Mark: I have had the idea building up inside my mind in idle moments over the past thirty-three years. The school I attended, the one in the story, had some unique attributes and stories attached to it, and for someone interested in history that got me thinking and one thought led to another.

Jacqueline: When Mark asked me if I would like to co-author the book I was delighted. It’s taken a year and a half from our first planning meeting to publication day.

What types of marketing do you do to promote your writing?

Jacqueline: We’re involved in many of the social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook and have our website. We’re currently organizing interviews and features on blogs.  

What are you currently working on? Do you have a new book out?

Mark: Book 2 in The Chester Bentley Series, which we can reveal will also be set in glorious Devon.

Do you have a project on the back burner? Tell me about it.

Mark: Myself, I have a completed history book on the Indian Famines under the British Raj. I have an MA in Imperialism so this is really my specialist area. It is a lamentable episode in British history and one we need to know more about, if we ever wish to claim that we truly know our own history. But as Bertrand Russell once said it is the citizens of the imperial power that are always among the last to know – or care – about circumstances in the colonies. I think he had a point.

Jacqueline: I’ve got two writing projects on hold at the moment. One is a book which I wrote for my own children a few years ago. The other is a romantic novel, set in Spain.

What would you tell a beginning writer who wants to publish but doesn't believe he/she has enough talent?

I suppose it’s a case of knowing if your writing is worth reading, and to find that out one can always turn to writing groups where people share their material and comment. That should give you strength to move forward secure in the knowledge that you are not deluding yourself. Beyond that, are you writing to serve a reading public or for a personal conviction? In the case of The Last Treasure of Ancient England, it’s both. In the case of my history book it is clearly the latter. A lot of people want to read a good treasure hunt, while not so many want to read about the negative aspects of the British Empire. The novel is an easier sell, while the non-fiction is a hard one. But you can always bypass the gatekeepers in today’s modern age and self-publish, after that if the material is read worthy then it’s a case of effective marketing and making sure your message gets heard. So, the final question is: are you ready to work as hard at marketing as you did when writing? If the answer is yes, then you need little more advice from me.

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A Question for Me:

Would you ever include an opinion/ idea, a situation that you felt passionate about and knew might annoy your general readership but is something that needs to be said in the interests of free speech and individual expression?

Wow, what a question. I suppose I would. I mean, especially if I'm writing a non-fiction piece, I would want to be clear to my readership how I really felt. As an example, I recently wrote a political post on my blog, and I knew that some of my readers wouldn't like it, while others would appreciate it. Still, I felt strongly that the piece needed to be written. You can find it here: http://idea-creations.blogspot.com/2016/10/voting-my-conscience.html.

Thanks for the question.

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Learn more about Mark and Jacqueline at the following sites:





Tuesday, November 29, 2016

AUTHOR INTERVIEW: Anne Evans

Tell me about yourself. What got you started in writing?

When I was a child, my dad had a personal library of 4000 books. He got me hooked on the reading addiction early. From there it was a natural step for me to start wanting to create books of my own. As a middle schooler, I fell in love with Rosemary Sutcliff’s juvenile historical fiction and at age 15 I finished my first full length novel. The rest is history.


How do you schedule your writing time? When do you write?

As the mom of a preschooler and new baby, I write either before the kiddos get up, or after they’re in bed. While on deadline, though, I’ve been known to attempt trying to string sentences together while my 4-year-old “Joe-Joe” has his preschool songs turned up to an ear-blasting amount of decibels.

How and where do you write? Do you prefer a lap top or some other method of getting your words down?

I type 120 wpm so trying to piece together thoughts on anything slower than a laptop keyboard drives me crazy. Thumb typing on my phone is sheer torture.

What's your favorite part about writing? Your least favorite part about writing?

My favorite part about writing is getting people’s edits in my critique groups and seeing my story through their eyes. My least favorite part about writing is getting people’s edits in my critique groups and seeing all my mistakes through their eyes.
Get the Book
at Amazon
How did you come up with your book idea? How long did it take you to write your book?

Several years before I had written Hot Lead & Cold Apple Pie, a romantic comedy set in the 1890s in the silver-mining town of Gilman, CO. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to get a book contract for it. Then my literary agent sent out a call for Christmas novella submissions. Using some of the characters from my former novel, I came up with Plum Pudding Bride on a whim and pounded out the entire manuscript in a month or so. Happily this year I got a contract on Hot Lead & Cold Apple Pie, so if you like Plum Pudding Bride, you will be able to stay in Gilman, CO a little longer for another love story full of adventure and comedy.

What types of marketing do you do to promote your writing?

I do a little bit of everything. Right now though, I just started a Facebook group connecting book bloggers and authors. Unlike other groups, it’s blogger focused and bloggers get to pick the books they want to request rather than having authors contact them. Here’s the link. If you’re a blogger, please do check out the group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/192888064470707/

What are you currently working on? Do you have a new book out?

Rosemary Sutcliff initiated my love of Ancient Rome and taking two years of Latin in college cemented that love. The first novel I ever wrote was set in the Roman Empire and finally I got a contract for novels set in that period. I have a four book series set in Ancient Rome coming out next year and I am currently working on edits. The Love & Warfare series follows a family of elite Roman patricians, the Paterculis, through the first and second century A.D. Each book is a love story, but there are plenty of villains, barbaric uprisings, smuggling, and slave revolts as well.

Do you have a project on the back burner? Tell me about it.

As soon as I get edits out of the way, I will start in earnest on my contemporary romantic suspense, From Harvard to Al-Qaeda. An atheist Harvard grad student ends up in Saudi Arabia posing as a native under a fake passport for her Ph.D. thesis in middle eastern studies. A Christian CIA operative falls in love with her and they get tangled up in Al-Qaeda of the Arabian Pennisula in Yemen trying to stop a terrorist plot. Still looking for beta readers if the premise intrigues you.

What would you tell a beginning writer who wants to publish but doesn't believe he/she has enough talent?

Most writing lectures I’ve attended start with a form of this quote: “If there’s a way you can convince yourself to give up writing, do so, because writing will drive you insane.” It’s true. You have to look far and wide to find as low paying, highly frustrating work as writing. I personally have tried to give up writing on numerous occasions and I just can’t. I need to write. Stories jump at me and I can’t seem to push them away.

So don’t worry about talent. If writing is in your blood, you’ll find a way to make your writing publish-worthy. One can’t write all the time for years without getting good at it. And if writing isn’t an all-consuming passion for you, do yourself a favor and find a job that pays more. Your checkbook will thank you.

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