Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Drama in Writing


Though some might say that they're only writing this scene to get to the next "great" one, or putting in this character because they feel as if their main character needs a "friend," or even, that this dialogue is needed though it's not very "exciting," I'm a firm believer that every aspect, from setting to character must be filled with some sort of drama.

Do you realize that every piece of your story, every scene, even every character has to be, well....captivating?

A writer just can't afford for a sentence, any sentence, to just lie there--flat.

They can't afford to place in an equally dull setting and equally dry character.

It just doesn't make... 

...cents.

(There is no typo there).

Who would finish a book riddled with boringness?

Is that a word?

Anyway, they wouldn't. Of that I am sure.

Drama in writing is achieved not only by the way your sentences are constructed, but by the feeling you place within them. Are you using your five senses? Is your main character asking thoughtful questions of themselves after an especially grueling scene? Are your characters well-rounded; are they more than stick figures, meaning they have their own personalities and quirks?

Does every scene, and I mean every scene, count for something in your book? Does it need to be there? If your scene doesn't connect with the main theme of your book; if it's there because you think it's "cool," or because you just "like it," ditch it.

Please...

Do you ever put a book down because it's so long winded? Do you want to get to the next best part because the part you are reading is about as dry as a paper plate? What can you learn from books whose pacing, stinks?

Every book has something to teach us, so I recommend reading lots and lots of them. Writing is important, too. As we write and then edit, especially as we begin to read our work aloud, we catch things. Dull sentences. Boring surroundings, or even a lack of surroundings. Awkward transitions, and more.

The best drama out there, in life as in fiction, is captivating because of all of the emotions intertwined. Love. Hate. Secretiveness. Thoughtfulness. Pain. Action. Hope. 

I'm not giving up on you.

Kathryn 
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